Monday, 28 November 2011

Radiators for kitchens






The kitchen is increasingly becoming the heart of the home, so it’s no surprise that radiator experts are often asked: “Which radiator is best for a kitchen?” The answer will depend on the specifics of your kitchen, but there are some common factors that apply to all kitchens when considering heating.

Heat output
This is always the first and most important factor. Speak to a radiator specialist or heating engineer to find out how much heat your kitchen needs from radiators to ensure a comfortable environment.

Space
As kitchen cabinets often take up the majority of wall space, finding a suitable place on the wall for a radiator can be a challenge. However, with so many different shapes and sizes of radiators available, there is likely to be a simple solution, such as a vertical radiator that can be positioned behind a door or on a pillar taking up otherwise unused space.

Hanging tea towels
You may wish to dry tea towels on a kitchen radiator so options could include a heated towel rail in ladder style with towel hanging space or, for more heat output, go for a radiator with a towel-hanging rail attached.

Valves
Due to the fluctuating temperature of a kitchen, from the hob, oven and other appliances, experts recommend the installation of thermostatic valves. Thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) have an in-built temperature sensor. The thermostatic valve maintains room temperature, by automatically adjusting the heat output from the radiator.
This means that you can make the most of any “free” heat the room receives, such as that from the sun, gas cookers or electrical appliances. As the valve is controlled automatically, it turns itself up and down, ensuring the radiators perform as efficiently as possible, reducing energy waste. For this reason, TRVs are the environmentally friendly valve choice.

Hygiene
It’s always worth considering hygiene when choosing appliances and materials for use in the kitchen. Radiators with a smooth finish are generally easier to wipe clean than radiators with a textured finish. Where possible, it is a good idea for the radiator’s pipework to come out of the wall instead of up from the floor. This will make mopping the floor easier and will limit areas where dirt could build up.

Matching
In order to really finish off a room and ensure a high quality finish, clever matching of finishes is essential. This can be done in all manner of ways as considered below.
Is there an Aga or Rayburn in your kitchen? If so, look for a matching paint finish on your radiator.
Going for granite worktops? Then consider a granite radiator; choose from a variety of stones such as Nero Assoluto. You can now even get radiators made of Silestone, a natural quartz material that is popular for use on kitchen work surfaces.
If you have a cooker hood in a brushed finish, then why not consider a radiator in brushed stainless steel to match.
And for those finishing touches, don’t forget your valves; a high quality valve in a matching finish can link key features together. Why not match your radiator valves to your light switches, cabinet handles and/or plug sockets for a high-end look.

Don't rush into a decision when considering the radiator(s) in your kitchen design. Think carefully about the position, design, practicality and finish of your radiator. Speak to an expert who will be able to guide you in the right direction, helping you avoid common pitfalls and enabling you to make the best choice for the heart of your home.

To speak to a real radiator specialist, contact Feature Radiators. Their expert team are available Monday to Saturday, so call them on 01274 567789 (10 lines), contact them via their website http://www.featureradiators.co.uk/ or visit them in their West Yorkshire showroom where they have over 250 radiators on display.

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